Does money buy happiness?

#6

Pawn Tactics Map Team
Joined
January 23, 2019
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Lmao I randomly check up on this site and I stumble upon the very question that has been bombarding my mind lately. So I just got my first pay check and it seems that I'm well on course to be a millionare in DKK(around 150k USD) somewhere at the age of 25, and that is after deducting all expenses and 40ish% of income to taxes. I currently have a car, apartment and a stable ass job, meaning that the majority of goals that society has set for a man, I have achieved at the age of 23. But here's the catch. I don't particularly enjoy my job and often when I come home, I think about whether if this is just it. If I have already hit my peak and that tomorrow is going to be the same as today, and on it goes for the entirety of my remaining life..

Yes. Money won't fix all of your problems, but I'd argue the majority of all problems most people have are solved through money.
But is happiness defined by the problems(or a lack thereof) in your life? My life is, at the moment, literally problem free. Job is going great, co-workers are nice, I have more money than I know how to spend, but I still wouldn't consider myself "happy". I remember the days where I would stay up late studying, for weeks leading up to an exam. I was exhausted and stressed, but somehow I felt fulfilled because my life had purpose, there was a reason for the suffering as well as people to share the hard times with. While money can "solve problems", I would still reckon that the things that truely gives life meaning can, in my opinion, never be bought with money
 
#7
Joined
December 27, 2018
Posts
1,036
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Somewhere
Lmao I randomly check up on this site and I stumble upon the very question that has been bombarding my mind lately. So I just got my first pay check and it seems that I'm well on course to be a millionare in DKK(around 150k USD) somewhere at the age of 25, and that is after deducting all expenses and 40ish% of income to taxes. I currently have a car, apartment and a stable ass job, meaning that the majority of goals that society has set for a man, I have achieved at the age of 23. But here's the catch. I don't particularly enjoy my job and often when I come home, I think about whether if this is just it. If I have already hit my peak and that tomorrow is going to be the same as today, and on it goes for the entirety of my remaining life..


But is happiness defined by the problems(or a lack thereof) in your life? My life is, at the moment, literally problem free. Job is going great, co-workers are nice, I have more money than I know how to spend, but I still wouldn't consider myself "happy". I remember the days where I would stay up late studying, for weeks leading up to an exam. I was exhausted and stressed, but somehow I felt fulfilled because my life had purpose, there was a reason for the suffering as well as people to share the hard times with. While money can "solve problems", I would still reckon that the things that truely gives life meaning can, in my opinion, never be bought with money

If you don't enjoy it you could technically just do it for a decade or so and then retire early and do everything your passionate about from there onward with your savings :D Gotta find your passion and hobbies
 
#8
Joined
February 3, 2019
Posts
281
Location
Germany
But is happiness defined by the problems(or a lack thereof) in your life? My life is, at the moment, literally problem free. Job is going great, co-workers are nice, I have more money than I know how to spend, but I still wouldn't consider myself "happy". I remember the days where I would stay up late studying, for weeks leading up to an exam. I was exhausted and stressed, but somehow I felt fulfilled because my life had purpose, there was a reason for the suffering as well as people to share the hard times with. While money can "solve problems", I would still reckon that the things that truely gives life meaning can, in my opinion, never be bought with money
You're right. Lack of problems doesn't really equal happiness. But (financial) problems often stand in the way of happiness.
To achieve true happiness, money is not required. But I'd argue it's one of many catalysts.
 
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#9

Pawn Tactics Map Team
Joined
January 23, 2019
Posts
97
You're right. Lack of problems doesn't really equal happiness. But (financial) problems often stand in the way of happiness.
To achieve true happiness, money is not required. But I'd argue it's one of many catalysts.
Everything is relative I suppose. In Scandinavia, I probably wouldn't agree as all basic needs are covered by the government. Everything beyon dthat can in theory be considered as excess, but I can see the point of view of someone struggling to put food on the table for their kids or unable to pay for vital medication. I think there for sure is a correlation between happiness and money. What I thought before was that the correlation was linear, as in more money = more happiness, but now I'm wondering if the curve is more like reverse U shaped and that at some point, more money could actually lead to less happiness?

If you don't enjoy it you could technically just do it for a decade or so and then retire early and do everything your passionate about from there onward with your savings :D Gotta find your passion and hobbies
Problem is finding what you're passionate about, I guess.. How did you find your passions and hobbies?
 
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